Oddly, she was on rather better terms with several individuals she had detested

Queen Anne (1665 – 1714)

Since Queen Anne’s death, the Duchess had acquired many new enemies. She had fallen out with her surviving daughters and most of her grandchildren, and the Whig party had long lost her allegiance. Her attitude to the new Hanoverian monarchy soon soured, and she developed a particular loathing for Caroline, Princess of Wales. Oddly, she was on rather better terms with several individuals she had detested in Queen Anne’s day. Although she turned him down, she was flattered when the widowed Duke of Somerset proposed. She even harboured kindly feelings for Jonathan Swift, declaring she had so enjoyed his Gulliver’s Travels she could forgive him anything.9

Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough, by Charles Jervas, after 1714[1]

With most of the world, however, the Duchess lived out of harmony. Her husband’s former chaplain told her that this was the inevitable fate of a person who exhibited “ill grounded suspicions, violent passions and a boundless liberty of expressing resentment of persons without distinction from the Prince downwards.” He informed her that, universally applied, her level of candour would “destroy society,” an assessment which, if Sarah found offensive, was certainly accurate.10 (Pg.536)

WE&P by EZorrilla.

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