Salvador Dali On The Meaning Behind His Art | The Dick Cavett Show

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Dick struggles to follow Salvador Dali as he guides him through his artwork, and the meanings behind it. Date aired – 02/11/71 – Salvador Dali

The Persistence of Memory 1931

Salvador Domingo Felipe Jacinto Dalí i Domènech, 1st Marquess of Dalí de Púbol gcYC was a Spanish surrealist artist renowned for his technical skill, precise draftsmanship, and the striking and bizarre images in his work. Born in Figueres, Catalonia, Dalí received his formal education in fine arts in Madrid. Wikipedia

The most famous Salvador Dali painting, The Persistence of Memory has been imprinted on America’s cultural consciousness for over 80 years. Because of that reason alone, every artist should be aware of Dali’s quintessential melting clocks, and his fascination with Surreal dreamscapes and subconscious symbolism.

Mistakes are almost always of a sacred nature. Never try to correct them. On the contrary: rationalize them, understand them thoroughly. After that, it will be possible for you to sublimate them. Salvador Dali.

What is surrealism? Salvador Dali is probably the most famous surrealist painter, exploring human unconsciousness and laying it on canvases. Here, the Persistence of Memory has melting clocks, some kind of monster (which could be Dali himself) and ants. What do they mean? There’s perhaps a different way to perceive dreams, time and memory through this painting.

Dick Cavett has been nominated for eleven Emmy awards (the most recent in 2012 for the HBO special, Mel Brooks and Dick Cavett Together Again), and won three. Spanning five decades, Dick Cavett’s television career has defined excellence in the interview format. He started at ABC in 1968, and also enjoyed success on PBS, USA, and CNBC.

His most recent television successes were the September 2014 PBS special, Dick Cavett’s Watergate, followed April 2015 by Dick Cavett’s Vietnam. He has appeared in movies, tv specials, tv commercials, and several Broadway plays. He starred in an off-Broadway production ofHellman v. McCarthy in 2014 and reprised the role at Theatre 40 in LA February 2015.

Cavett has published four books beginning with Cavett (1974) and Eye on Cavett (1983), co-authored with Christopher Porterfield. His two recent books — Talk Show: Confrontations, Pointed Commentary, and Off-Screen Secrets (2010) and Brief Encounters: Conversations, Magic moments, and Assorted Hijinks(October 2014) are both collections of his online opinion column, written for The New York Times since 2007. Additionally, he has written for The New Yorker, TV Guide, Vanity Fair, and elsewhere.

WE&P by: EZorrilla

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